A Security-focused Introduction to HTTP

HTTP is a ubiquitous protocol and is one of the cornerstones of the web. If you are a newcomer to web application security, a sound knowledge of the HTTP protocol will make your life easier when interpreting findings by automated security tools, and it’s a necessity if you want to take such findings further with manual testing. What follows is a security-focused introduction to the HTTP protocol to help you get started.

HTTP overview

HTTP is a message-based (request, response), stateless protocol comprised of headers (key-value pairs) and an optional body. Three versions of HTTP have been released so far — HTTP/1.0 (released in 1996, rare usage), HTTP 1.1 (released in 1997, wide usage) and HTTP/2 (released in 2015, increasing usage).
The HTTP protocol works over the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). TCP is one of the core protocols within the Internet protocol suite and it provides a reliable, ordered, and error-checked delivery of a stream of data, making it ideal for HTTP. The default port for HTTP is 80, or 443 if you’re using HTTPS (an extension of the HTTP over TLS).
HTTP is a line-based protocol, meaning that each header is represented on its own line, with each line ending in a Carriage Return Line Feed (CRLF) with a blank line separating the head from the optional body of the request or response.
Up to HTTP/1.1, HTTP was a text-based protocol, however, with HTTP/2 this has changed — HTTP/2, unlike its predecessors is a binary protocol with most implementations requiring TLS encryption. It’s worth noting that for the vast majority of cases (and certainly, for this article) interacting with the HTTP/2 protocol won’t be any different. It’s also worth mentioning that HTTP/1.1 isn’t going away anytime soon, and it’s still early days for HTTP/2 (as such, HTTP/1.1 will be referenced throughout this article).
Irfan Shakeel
Irfan Shakeel, the founder of ehacking project, he also hosts cyber security training classes at EH Academy. He has discovered many vulnerabilities in the famous platforms (like Google, Dailymotion, Harvard University & etc.). He specializes in Network hacking, VoIP pentesting & digital forensics. He is the author of the book title “Hacking from Scratch”.

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